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Home / Australia Immigration / Life In Australia

Life in Australia

Resource for the latest information of Life in Australia. Here you will find the latest information of Life in Australia along with UK immigration HSMP, Canada Immigration, Australia Immigration, New Zealand Immigration, USA Immigration and Work Permits.

Life in Australia

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Sydney is a friendly metropolis, the largest and oldest city in Australia and the capital of the state of New South Wales. The city, which hosted the 2000 Olympic Games, is renowned for being safe, tolerant and multicultural, offering a wide array of cultural and culinary experiences. The main University campus is within walking distance of the city centre, Chinatown and inner city suburbs where there are bustling cafes and a wide variety of restaurants. There are also excellent transport links to beaches, parks, theatres, galleries, museums and the city's many other attractions.

People of Australia

Australians are well known for their open and friendly manner. They are hard working but they also like to have a good time. Australians generally have a relaxed outlook on life and social relationships between men and women are usually informal . Australians grow up believing that people should have equal social, legal and political rights and the Australian Constitution protects those rights. Australian women are entitled to the same rights, status and opportunities as men. It is common for women to be represented at all levels of management and to continue to pursue careers after they are married or have children.

Greetings

People usually shake hands the first time they meet, especially when meeting for business. Around the campus, 'Hi' and 'Hello' are more standard greetings and addressing people by their given names is both common and acceptable. Don't be concerned if you are not confident communicating in English. People will understand. If they are talking too fast, simply ask them to speak a little bit slower.

Religions in Australia

Spiritual centres of almost every culture, ethnic and religious identity can be found in Sydney. The International Office can give you a list of the various churches, mosques, temples and other 'Places of Worship'.

Punctuality

You are expected to be on time in Australia. Lectures, tutorials, church services and most social occasions begin punctually. If you are going to be late for a social occasion, the polite thing to do is call your host to let them know you will be late.

Driving in Australia

When in a motor vehicle, it is compulsory to wear a seatbelt at all times, even in a taxi. If you do not, you may receive a fine (called a "ticket"). In Australia, we drive on the left hand side of the road. Traffic speed is limited to 50 or 60 kilometres per hour in cities and towns; 100 km/h on highways; and 110 km/h on freeways and motorways. There are very strict penalties for exceeding the speed limit. If you are driving, you must carry your driver's licence with you at all times. If your licence is not in English, you must also carry an English translation. Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is illegal, and punishable by law. There are limits to the amount of alcohol you can consume before driving . Please contact the RTA for more information. If you are "pulled over" (instructed by a police officer to move to the side of the road and stop your car) you should wait in your car for instructions from the police officer. The officer may ask you to take a breath test to see if you have been drinking alcohol. If you are given a ticket, be polite and do not attempt to pay the police officer. You should pay the fine (or dispute it) according to the instructions on the ticket. Please note that this is a very brief guide to road rules, and should in no way substitute for or replace information provided by the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA).

This information may be subject to change. For more information, contact the RTA.

Location: Centennial Plaza,
260 Elizabeth Street,
Surry Hills NSW 2010

This is the closest RTA to UTS. For other branches, please telephone. Phone: 132 213

Living Expenses in Australia

With the '8105-Work Rights' condition on their visa students are permitted to work up to 20 hours a week during semester, however there is a lot of competition for part-time work. You should not expect that money earned from a part-time job will cover tuition fees. In addition to student fees, it is estimated a student, without spouse or dependents, will need between $1,200-$1,500 a month to pay for health cover, books, accommodation, clothing, food and bus/train fares. You may need more in the first year to cover the initial cost of books, rental bond payment (equivalent to four weeks' rent which is refundable at the end of the lease), two weeks' rent in advance and basic furniture items. If you have a spouse, you will require approximately an additional $6,000 each year and $3,500 for each child, as well as fees for children's education. These estimates do not allow for personal entertainment, running a car or extensive travel within Australia.

Public Transport in Australia

Sydney is well-served by government and private buses, ferries, trains, taxis, a monorail and the light rail. Public transport is relatively cheap, and you can save money by buying weekly, monthly or yearly tickets. Travel Passes, which allow unlimited bus/ferry or bus/train/ferry travel (within a certain area), are available from City Rail stations, Sydney Ferries ticket offices, Sydney Buses ticket offices and newsagents. Prices range up to $29 - $54 per week, depending on how far you travel. UTS City Campus is conveniently located ten minutes' walk from Sydney Central railway station, and there is a bus stop directly in front of the Tower building. In NSW, international fee-paying students are not permitted to buy concession fares on City Rail, Sydney Ferries or any city or suburban buses. however, Country Link (a rail service which links Sydney with regional areas and other capital cities) and many coach companies do offer concession fares. Australian-Government sponsored students are eligible for concession fares on all public transport in NSW (www.sta.nsw.gov.au)

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